Gallery Options Clients Q & A's Contact

YORK
WEDDING
PHOTOGRAPHY

B A R R Y  M A L E

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS -

What's your approach to photographing weddings?

Wedding photographers range from 'weekend shooters' who having a full-time job and photograph weddings as a paying hobby, to 'production line' photographers whose business model is based on maximising their income stream from the 40 weddings a year they aim to shoot. To me, every wedding is different and special - I aim to shoot no more than 12 weddings a year, so that I can give each one the time and commitment that it deserves,

What's involved in shooting a wedding?

Much more than you might think! - I'll want to meet with you both several times before the big day, getting to know you a little (and allowing you to become comfortable with me), while we go through your plan of events, how they're going to flow together and how they'll want to be photographed. There will be recce's of all the venues - even if I've worked at them before - and I'll be at the rehearsal if you're getting married in church. Every wedding is different - the light will be different, what happens will be different and I'll want to visualise how I can capture your wedding with a fresh and original perspective. Obviously, on the day you are my total focus - even if it's a two hour booking I'll not be thinking about anything else. Afterwards, I'll spend time going through the pictures, selecting the best and beginning the retouching work before placing them in the client area of my website.

What's your background?

Photography was my first love: it evolved into movie photography and I eventually became an award-winning documentary cameraman. Several transformations later, I've returned to my roots, doing what I love best - photographing people in all their many expressions.

What's your style?

You can call it lifestyle or documentary, combined with my creative vision to create my own personal style: I'm looking for the magic moment, the fleeting glance and the spontaneous emotion, but I also want to capture the essence of the occasion, to interact, stimulate and create, and then to add something special.

What areas do you cover?

I'm based in York, but am happy to travel to surrounding towns and cities in Yorkshire such as Malton, Scarborough, Harrogate, Thirsk, Wetherby, Ripon, Leeds and further afield.

Do you photograph other things?

Weddings and family celebrations are a great love, but I also enjoy portraiture and have always been drawn to live performance, whether musical or theatrical. I have another website - www.alternativeoccasions.com that focuses on other areas that interest me.

How do I choose the right photographer from all the choices available?

REALITY CHECK - Most people start off by thinking that hiring a wedding photographer is a bit like hiring a plumber to put in some radiators, so the lowest price is the best price. In reality it's not like that at all - you're sharing a very special occasion with a total stranger so it's pretty important that you like them and feel comfortable having them in your space. I suggest that your priorities should be in this order -

The first is that you love the photographs.

Second is that you like the photographer.

Third is that you are comfortable with their fee.

COST - Up to around £1000, you will get what you pay for - there are thousands of aspiring photographers and some will even work for free just for the experience. Beyond £1,000 you tend to be paying for the reputation of the photographer. How important are the pictures to you? If you just want snaps, everyone there will have their smart phones out. If you ask your enthusiastic friend to do the photos, when the time comes they're probably going to be very nervous at the responsibility and, in the end, you'll get what you get. If you plump for a low price photographer, it's likely that you'll get what is called a 'weekend shooter' - which means that photography is not their main profession. If cost is of overriding importance this is an option, but ask a lot of penetrating questions and make sure you look at a lot of their pictures (preferably, the results from an entire wedding) before you make a decision.

Full time professionals come in all shapes and sizes. Beware the pro who does 40 or more weddings a year - they'll be very competent, but it's inevitable that you'll be part of a production line, the shots are going to tend to be formulaic and they're not going to have the time to establish any real rapport with you. Beware also the big name celebratory photographer who'll charge you a LOT. Look closely at their pictures...are they any better than someone who is not a celebrity?..are you paying for a reputation rather than the results....?

STYLE - Have a think about the kind of pictures that you want. Have a look at LOTS of wedding photographs.... What works for you? What do you enjoy looking at? If you were the bride in the picture, would the feelings and emotions of the day be flooding back? If you decide that you want to have lots of pictures that show spontaneous expressions, how much experience does your potential photographer have of working in that kind of way? If you want some pictures that are posed, do they still look natural? How much time is your photographer going to make people wait around while things get organised?

WHAT DO YOU GET? The possibilities these days are limitless - do you want to be able to select real photographic prints that you can hang on the wall? If so, what are they going to cost? Are you going to be tied into an inflexible package or can you change the options? Do you want an album? - again are you tied into a fixed option or can you change things like the number of pages or the type of cover?....How much will you be consulted about the layout and the content and can you make the selections? Having pictures on a DVD is an attractive option - how many will you get? Will they all have been optimised for home printing? Remember that the picture that comes out of your printer will likely be inferior to the picture your photographer had on his/her monitor or that would have arrived from a professional lab.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST - On the big day your photographer is not going to be invisible and you'll need to be working together if you're wanting him or her to get the best possible pictures, so it's really quite important that you like them, feel comfortable with them and feel that you can trust them to be working with you and for you. Some photographers are known to just take over the show, some tend to be socially awkward and hang back, whilst others enter into the spirit of the occasion and add to everyone's enjoyment. Take the time to make sure that you get what you're really wanting.

If you'd like to delve more deeply into the challenge of How to Choose Your Photographer, an American named Glen Johnson has produced a wealth of information for brides-to-be as an e-book available from his website - the only real difference with British weddings is that the fees here are (regrettably) rather lower than in the U.S.!  You're welcome to use this link - http://www.aperturephotographics.com/bridesguide.html

How do I choose the right photographer from all the choices available?

REALITY CHECK - Most people start off by thinking that hiring a wedding photographer is a bit like hiring a plumber to put in some radiators, so the lowest price is the best price. In reality it's not like that at all - you're sharing a very special occasion with a total stranger so it's pretty important that you like them and feel comfortable having them in your space. I suggest that your priorities should be in this order -

    The first is that you love the photographs.

    Second is that you like the photographer.

    Third is that you are comfortable with their fee.

COST - Up to around £1000, you will get what you pay for - there are thousands of aspiring photographers and some will even work for free just for the experience. Beyond £1,000 you tend to be paying for the reputation of the photographer. How important are the pictures to you? If you just want snaps, everyone there will have their smart phones out. If you ask your enthusiastic friend to do the photos, when the time comes they're probably going to be very nervous at the responsibility and, in the end, you'll get what you get. If you plump for a low price photographer, it's likely that you'll get what is called a 'weekend shooter' - which means that photography is not their main profession. If cost is of overriding importance this is an option, but ask a lot of penetrating questions and make sure you look at a lot of their pictures (preferably, the results from an entire wedding) before you make a decision.

Full time professionals come in all shapes and sizes. Beware the pro who does 40 or more weddings a year - they'll be very competent, but it's inevitable that you'll be part of a production line, the shots are going to tend to be formulaic and they're not going to have the time to establish any real rapport with you. Beware also the big name celebratory photographer who'll charge you a LOT. Look closely at their pictures...are they any better than someone who is not a celebrity?..are you paying for a reputation rather than the results....?

STYLE - Have a think about the kind of pictures that you want. Have a look at LOTS of wedding photographs.... What works for you? What do you enjoy looking at? If you were the bride in the picture, would the feelings and emotions of the day be flooding back? If you decide that you want to have lots of pictures that show spontaneous expressions, how much experience does your potential photographer have of working in that kind of way? If you want some pictures that are posed, do they still look natural? How much time is your photographer going to make people wait around while things get organised?

WHAT DO YOU GET? The possibilities these days are limitless - do you want to be able to select real photographic prints that you can hang on the wall? If so, what are they going to cost? Are you going to be tied into an inflexible package or can you change the options? Do you want an album? - again are you tied into a fixed option or can you change things like the number of pages or the type of cover?....How much will you be consulted about the layout and the content and can you make the selections? Having pictures on a DVD is an attractive option - how many will you get? Will they all have been optimised for home printing? Remember that the picture that comes out of your printer will likely be inferior to the picture your photographer had on his/her monitor or that would have arrived from a professional lab.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST - On the big day your photographer is not going to be invisible and you'll need to be working together if you're wanting him or her to get the best possible pictures, so it's really quite important that you like them, feel comfortable with them and feel that you can trust them to be working with you and for you. Some photographers are known to just take over the show, some tend to be socially awkward and hang back, whilst others enter into the spirit of the occasion and add to everyone's enjoyment. Take the time to make sure that you get what you're really wanting.








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